Historians named to honor roll of speakers

June 14, 2016 — Four more faculty members of the Department of History have been named to the Organization of American Historians’ Distinguished Lectureship Program: Kathryn Olmsted, professor and chair; Andrés Reséndez and Louis Warren, professors; and Lisa Materson, associate professor.

With their appointments, UC Davis now has eight historians in the speakers bureau, the most of any UC campus. The others from UC Davis are Ari Kelman and Eric Rauchway, professors; and Gregory Downs and Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor, associate professors.

“I’m honored to be selected to receive this distinction,” Olmsted said. “And as chair, I’m thrilled that so many members of our department have been selected. I think these distinctions demonstrate the depth and breadth of the research in U.S. history here at UC Davis.”

Lecturers are invited to speak each year to audiences at museums, libraries, universities, community centers, churches and synagogues, and other venues across the country.

More than 400 scholars nationwide have been OAH Distinguished Lecturers for their contributions to the field of American history. Participating speakers each give at least one lecture a year and donate their fees to the OAH, which promotes scholarship, teaching and presentation of American history. “We thank these historians for their service to the organization and for helping advance our mission,” said Katherine Finley, the OAH’s executive director. “And we congratulate them on achieving this high honor.”

More than 400 scholars nationwide have been Organization of American Historians’ Distinguished Lecturers for their contributions to the field of American history. Participating speakers each give at least one lecture a year and donate their fees to the organization, which promotes scholarship, teaching and presentation of American history.

Lecture Topics

Gregory Downs

  • Remembering Reconstruction

  • The Civil War after Appomattox

  • Force, Freedom, and the End of Slavery

  • Reconstruction: The Second American Revolution

  • Custer’s Second-to-Last-Stand

Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor

  • America Under the Hammer: Auctions and Market Culture

  • Gender, Justice, and the American Revolution

  • The Politics of Shopping in Early America

  • Work, Family, and the Development of American Capitalism

Ari Kelman

  • A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek

  • For Liberty and Empire: How the Civil War Bled Into the Indian Wars

  • Battle Lines: Producing a Graphic History of the Civil War

  • Katrina in Context: An Environmental History of New Orleans

  • A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans

Lisa Materson

  • African American Women and Electoral Politics from Reconstruction to the New Deal

  • The Historical Origins of the Obama Presidency in Chicago’s South Side

  • Generations of Protest: Women and the Struggle for Puerto Rico’s Independence

  • American History as Women’s History

Kathryn Olmsted

  • American Entry into World War II

  • California Farmworkers from the New Deal to Cesar Chavez

  • Labor Battles of the 1930s

Eric Rauchway

  • Bretton Woods and the Postwar Economic Order

  • How Well Did the New Deal Work?

  • Some of That Jazz: The Energetic Disaster of the 1920s

  • The Assassination of William McKinley and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America

  • Why Was Theodore Roosevelt an Effective President?

 Andrés Reséndez

  • Cabeza de Vaca and the Problem of Early Encounters

  • The Other Slavery: Coerced Indian Labor in North America

  • The Pacific: Connecting the Largest Ocean in the World

Louis Warren

  • God’s Red Son: The Survival of the Ghost Dance

  • Buffalo Bill’s America: The Wild West Show in the Global Gilded Age

  • The Hunter’s Game: Poaching and Wildlife in American History